Seamus McLoone

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General information

Period spent at QUB 31 Aug 1996 23:00 - 31 Aug 2000 23:00
Short Bio
I obtained my secondary education in St. Columba's Comprehensive School in my home town of Glenties, Co. Donegal. I graduated with a first class B.Eng. honours degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Queen's University Belfast in 1996. I began postgraduate research in September 1996, joining the Intelligent Systems and Control Group at Queen's. I completed my PhD, entitled Nonlinear Identification using Local Model Networks, in September 2000.

In August 2001, I took up a permanent post as Lecturer in the Department of Electronic Engineering in the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. I currently teach a range of subjects including Digital Systems, Control System Design, Electric Circuits, Optimisation and System Dynamics. My research interests include local model networks, fuzzy logic, nonlinear system identification, latency masking in distributed interactive systems and incorporating modern technology in engineering education.
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Email address: seamus.mcloone@eeng.nuim.ie
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Personal Note regarding George …

My final year project was in the area of Fuzzy Logic under the supervision of Prof. George Irwin. My PhD in Local Model Networks was also supervised by George. In addition, George taught me Electric Circuits (in first year, all the way back in 1993) and Control (in third year in 1996).

I can honestly say that George had an important influence on my journey through my undergraduate and postgraduate degree and, indeed, on my current career. It’s no coincidence that I am now teaching Electric Circuits, System Dynamics and Control Systems (and indeed using some of the same material that was once taught to me by George himself!).

However, the one thing that I will always be grateful to George for is my ability to write technical research papers, something that has proved valuable to me ever since. I will never forget my first corrected conference paper … I’m not sure how many red pens George went through, but there was a lot of red ink on that first draft! The lessons from that, and subsequent papers, has been well learned and has benefited me greatly ever since.

A sincere thank you, George, for your years of supervision and guidance. Enjoy your retirement.